Category TOPICS

Colombian students produce sanitary napkins and diapers with corn residues
TOPICS

Colombian students produce sanitary napkins and diapers with corn residues

This project is one of the 10 finalists of the Gabriel Betancourt Mejía Latin American Award, in which they compete against others from Argentina, Cuba and Brazil, chosen from almost 100 proposals. The team presented the project in Bogotá to experts who will evaluate it to choose the top three. This proposal, which is in its initial stage, was born in a research hotbed as a joint work of Verónica Valencia and Sindy López, students of the Medellín National University, and Juan Pablo Vélez, of the Metropolitan Technological Institute.

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Plants have 15 more senses than humans

The plant intelligence expert, Stefano Mancuso, explains the amazing sensory capacity of plants. We have evidence that language is present in all living things, although we are unable to understand its meaning in most cases. From dolphins or whales to bees and termites.
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Stop the plunder of the seas

The world's oceans are overexploited, polluted with plastics, and spilled. There are fishing fleets emptying the oceans to produce fishmeal and fish oil, which are used in aquaculture as food. Global consumption of fish and shellfish has doubled in the last 50 years. Each year, 80 million tons, almost half of the fish, shrimp and mussels come from aquaculture.
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Resources for Teachers: How to Reduce Waste in Schools

Schools dump huge amounts of waste every day, which ends up in landfills, meaning we lose valuable resources. Most waste in schools is recyclable. However, schools currently only recycle a small percentage of their waste. A large proportion of school waste is food, paper and cardboard (75 by weight for primary schools and 70 by weight for secondary schools).
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Bees can surf to avoid drowning in the water

A team of scientists from the California Institute of Technology has discovered how bees can surf through the water to move and be able to return to land when they get trapped. It all started when engineer Chris Roh was walking through the California Institute of Technology in the United States. There he saw a bee trapped in the water, stood up and watched it navigate to escape.
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The European Union-Mercosur trade agreement will intensify the climate crisis caused by agriculture

“The reality is that the FTA between the European Union and Mercosur will cause a significant increase in global emissions of greenhouse gases. Although to our knowledge a full audit on the climate impact of the agreement has not been provided, GRAIN calculated emissions from the agricultural sector, analyzing the provisions of the agreement that establish quantitative targets for increased trade in several important agricultural products.
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Reducing air pollution has instant health benefits

Continuous exposure to air pollution has been linked to a host of diseases, from lung to brain, in people of all ages. It follows that reducing exposure to toxic air should have health benefits. And indeed, that's what the authors of a new study have found.
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Sustainability is no longer enough, we need regenerative cultures

Sustainability alone is not an appropriate goal. The word sustainability itself is inappropriate, because it does not tell us what we are really trying to sustain. In 2005, after spending two years working on my doctoral thesis on design for sustainability, I began to realize that what is really we are attempting to sustain is the underlying pattern of health, resilience, and adaptability that keep this planet in a condition where life as a whole can flourish.
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Circular economy: the new development model

The circular economy has been installed as the new litany, chanted ad nauseam in forums, conferences and the media. However, it is much more than a concept. This new development model stands as the only one possible in the face of the demographic, environmental and social problems that humanity faces.
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A new artificial leaf could help us fight climate change

"We call it an artificial leaf because it mimics real leaves and the photosynthesis process," says Yimin A. Wu, professor of engineering at the Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology. Plants are among the most effective agents of carbon sequestration, a process by which carbon dioxide is blocked from the atmosphere.
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Another September waiting ... 4 years after the Barrick spill

Hoping that our rulers do not deceive us, that they enforce the law also to the powerful. Because they always make it easier, they fall with all the rigor of the law on the weakest, on the defenseless and vulnerable people, and not on the multinationals. Furthermore, they are willing to violate and modify laws to protect the soulless interests of extractivist corporations.
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The planet's cataclysmic past hints at our near future

If we want to see the future of our planet, we could also look to the past. The state of affairs during the last interglacial 125,000 years ago, to be more precise. So say the authors of a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, among the last interglacial, which lasted between 125.
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Look at the beautiful spiral hives of the Sugarbag bees

There are fourteen species of stingless bees that are native to Australia. Among these, the sugar sack bee or bush bee is particularly notable for the beautiful hives they make. Not all bees sting. There are around five hundred species of bees out of every twenty thousand that have lost this ability, but exhibit other defensive behaviors such as biting or showering intruders with wax, plant resin, and mud.
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Hot weather could devastate future rice crops

Rice is the world's largest staple crop, providing food for half of the planet's population. Rice will play an even more critical role in feeding billions in the coming decades, as the number of people grows even more, but there are problems on the horizon for rice cultivation, warn researchers from the Stanford University.
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Shoes made with banana fiber. Local and sustainable artisan design

A new line of shoes surprises by the material with which they are made. It is a shoe developed by the company Indianes that uses banana fiber extracted from agricultural waste. The company, founded and directed by Diana Feliu and Iván Rojas inspired by sustainability, works on different lines of shoes in which it uses hemp, natural pigments and even recycles your old shoes.
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Protecting bees should be a global priority

Bees and wasps, let's be honest, have some annoying habits. They love to haunt our sugary drinks with their sting at the ready when we try to drive them away, yet these flying insects perform invaluable functions in ecosystems. They pollinate flowers, thus helping plants reproduce.
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This is how birds alert us to climate change

Some birds no longer migrate, others 'move', some shorten their trips, others lengthen them ... climate change is turning everything upside down. We show you some of its most notable effects: It is estimated that about 50,000 million birds leave their breeding area each year and migrate to other warmer latitudes.
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Large companies profit from the suffering of dolphins

Swimming with dolphins or going to a show with them is part of a cruel activity disguised as education and well-being. Learn about the reality these animals suffer to change their lives.Around the world, cetaceans (dolphins, whales and porpoises) are extracted from nature and bred in captivity in order to use them for entertainment in tourist sites.
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