TOPICS

Spain creates tax for the sun

Spain creates tax for the sun

By José Carlos Díaz Zanelli

A little encouraging news regarding the domestic use of renewable energy has taken place in Spain in recent months. It is a kind of tax that the Spanish Government has created for the use of solar panels.

Under a rhetoric that tries to project an image of promoting the use of renewable energies, the Spanish Government enacted at the end of 2015 a law that levied taxes on those who make use of energy produced by solar panels. The concept under which self-consumers must make payments is the toll.

The approved rule implied creating a registry of solar energy self-consumers. The term for said registration expired in April 2016, so it would now be illegal in Spain to use solar energy for domestic consumption without being registered.

Rejection to the measure

In practice what this represents is the obligation to pay a tax for the sun. For the Spanish Photovoltaic Union, what this measure seeks is to stop the development of domestic solar energy, in contradiction to what government representatives usually say.

For its part, the National Association of Photovoltaic Energy Producers has described the measure as "absolutely unacceptable" for not having social support. In the same terms, various environmental groups have been manifesting themselves in Spain.

The only response that has come from the Spanish Government in defense of this measure has been the statements of the Secretary of State for Energy, Alberto Nadal, who to defend the sun tax has indicated that "self-consumption without charges is the most antisocial thing that exists".

For now, the only ones that seem to clearly benefit from this measure are the electricity companies that have a monopoly on domestic and industrial energy. This is because one of the most efficient renewable industries would be slowing down for the future. The accusations of lobbying in the Spanish field have not been long in coming.

SERVINDI


Video: SPAIN NEWS GURJIT SINGH 01022021 (September 2021).