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In winter eat more Yang foods

In winter eat more Yang foods

By Ellen Wang

During the winter season, eating nutritious and “warm” foods is essential to stay healthy with a strong immune system.

“Supplements the body when it is weak; it warms the body when it is cold ”. This is an important principle in traditional Chinese medicine. In winter, when it is cold, the key to a good diet is to follow the course of nature - eat well according to the season - and pay attention to cultivating “yang” energy in the body.

Eat more foods that are "warm" or "hot" in their energetic nature, especially the kinds of foods that can boost kidney energy. This type of food aid improves the body's ability to resist cold.

Yang foods can be found in grains like wheat or a variety of whole grains, soybeans, legumes, and vegetables like onion, garlic, turnips, or cauliflower.

Hot soups and nuts also help warm the core of the body and keep us well fed.

Avoid raw foods during winter as much as possible, as they tend to cool the body.

Foods high in protein and fiber also help keep the body warm. One of my favorite sources of protein in the winter is duck. Duck meat is good to accompany it with ginger, to aid digestion. Chicken is good too; it is "warm" and energetic, rich in protein, and its nutrients help prevent colds.

Avoid "cold" foods

According to the Chinese theory of food energies, there are five different categories of food: hot, warm, cool, cold, and neutral.

When the weather starts to change and it starts to get cold in the fall, don't eat cantaloupe, watermelon, green melon or cucumber. Since they are "cold" by nature, eating melons in the winter can cause diarrhea.

Eating according to the seasons of the year is especially important for older people, as their organ function is weaker, and they tend to have a cold stomach.

My first winter fruit suggestion is the pear. Pear moisturizes, can relieve cough, dry skin and itching.

Apple is another of my favorite fruits for winter. Both apples and pears are, in fact, "neutral" in nature, so while they have specific benefits for winter, they can be eaten in any season.

* Ellen Wang is a Certified Comprehensive Health Counselor at the ‘Tao Institute of Mind & Body Medicine’, in the United States, led by Dr. Jingduan Yang.

The Epoch Times


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