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Mosha, the elephant who received a prosthesis after losing a leg due to a mine explosion

Mosha, the elephant who received a prosthesis after losing a leg due to a mine explosion

This week, the elephant received her ninth artificial leg, which is adjusted for her weight and size.

Volunteers from the shrine city of Lampang, Thailand, noted that the absence of the limb created a number of medical complications in Mosha.

Orthopedist Therdchai Jivacate, who helped design the prostheses for Mosha and other elephants, told Britain's The Daily Telegraph that "without walking, she was going to die," after having one of Mosha's artificial legs installed in 2009.

Mosha is just one of several elephants that have been injured by mines in the border region, according to the Friends of the Asian Elephant foundation.

The rebels have clashed with the Myanmar government for decades on the border with Thailand.

The foundation created the first elephant care hospital in Lampang in 1993 and currently has 17 patients.

Motola

One of Mosha's companions, Motola, was also a victim of a mine in 1999 while serving as a timber transporter for local workers.

Unfortunately, she has not been as responsive as Mosha with the artificial legs due to the nature of her injuries, her vets at the Lampang care center told you.

Motola tried a new prosthesis this week, which is crucial for its growth to occur without interruption.


Motola, another elephant mine victim, has not been as responsive as Mosha to prosthetics due to the nature of her injuries.

BBC


Video: Mosha the elephant gets new prosthetic leg (September 2021).